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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 057, February 2016

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Contents

Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts Forum
A species of squash believed to be extinct...
A Last Stand for Lelu
The first official Climate Refugees
BEYOND FLINT, MICHIGAN
A Canoe Journey Inspires Native Youth
UN Condemns Doctrine of Discovery
Native Abundance and the Wisdom of Native Food Practices
Montana tribes receives $3.1 million for housing
Mexico indigenous people: Pope Francis asks for forgiveness

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Don't miss this special three-day forum with the theme: Polishing the Silver Covenant
Chain: Building Relationships for the good of the Earth.
September 13, 14 and 15
at the Six Nations Grand River Reserve, Ontario, Canada.

A subtheme to this Forum is Reaching Consensus on Commitments to Action. During the
previous six Forums we have talked about problems and needs. Now, we will create
plans to act. Participants will implement Six Nations-like protocols for consensus-based
decision-making to create action plans to foment change.... change in our
families, change in our communities, change in the U.S., and change
in the way the Earth is treated.

To reserve a place register by Clicking Here
or call 406-587-1002 or email Lisa Sutton,
Lisa@twocircles.org. This Forum is limited to
60 participants so if you're planning to attend, act now.

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'Extinct Squash' Grown From 800-Year-Old Heirloom Seeds

Written by: Daniel Jennings Current Events October 6, 2015

"A species of squash believed to be extinct has been grown from 800-year-old seeds found at an archeological dig.

"A group of students in Winnipeg, Canada, proved that heirloom seeds can be viable even if they have been buried for centuries. They had a feast in September to celebrate the discovery.

"'There was an archeological dig on First Nations (Native) land in Wisconsin and they found a clay vessel about the size of a tennis ball, and in that vessel they found seeds,' Brian Etkin, the coordinator of the Garden of Learning, told APTN News...." Read the Entire Article.

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   Click to watch this trailer.

A Last Stand for Lelu - Pre-launch Trailer

Members of Lax Kw'alaams First Nation made national news by rejecting a $1-billion offer from the Malaysian oil and gas company, Petronas to build a massive liquefied natural gas terminal on Lelu Island. The waters surrounding Lelu Island are considered to be critical for the rearing of millions of wild B.C. salmon. Now, the resistance of Lax Kw'alaams is the subject of a new short documentary, "A Last Stand for Lelu," which premiered Feb. 15 at the Vancouver International Mountain Film Festival.

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Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha Indians become the first official Climate Refugees

By Pakalolo - Monday Feb 15, 2016 - 5:06 AM MST

"The Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw just received $48 million to move off of their disappearing south Louisiana island. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced in January that it had awarded the tribe $48 million to pay for a move, most likely farther north and inland, making them the first community of official climate refugees in the continental (lower 48) United States. The tribe wants to move as a group as they are rightfully concerned that a dispersal of their people would be the end of their tribe...." Read the Entire Article.

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BEYOND FLINT, MICHIGAN: MAINSTREAMING THE NAVAJO WATER CRISIS

Click to watch this video on YouTube

"Recent media coverage and spiraling public outrage over the water crisis in Flint, Michigan has completely eclipsed the ongoing environmental justice struggles of the Navajo. Even worse, the media continues to frame the situation in Flint as some sort of isolated incident. It is not. Rather, it is symptomatic of a much wider and deeper problem of environmental racism in the United States.

"The history of uranium mining on Navajo (Diné) land is forever intertwined with the history of the military industrial complex. In 2002, the American Journal of Public Health ran an article entitled, 'The History of Uranium Mining and the Navajo People'. Head investigators for the piece, Brugge and Gobel, framed the issue as a 'tradeoff between national security and the environmental health of workers and communities.' The national history of mining for uranium ore originated in the late 1940's when the United States decided that it was time to cut away its dependence on imported uranium. Over the next 40 years, some 4 million tons of uranium ore would be extracted from the Navajo's territory, most of it fueling the Cold War nuclear arm's race...." Read the Entire Article.

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Drug Use Down, Hope Up: A Canoe Journey Inspires Native Youth

Reversing the trauma of assimilation isn't easy, but tribes believe that bringing ancestral values directly to the youth is the answer.

Yessenia Funes posted Dec 10, 2015
"Vincent and Sequoia Chargualaf stand on the rocky shore of Port Madison Bay, Washington, welcoming canoe paddlers as their Suquamish ancestors had done for generations. In honor of that history, today's Pacific Northwest Natives climb in their canoes and paddle for the annual Tribal Canoe Journey, a drug- and alcohol- free event where tribes gather and share their cultures. This year, the Suquamish are hosting visitors for a night, welcoming them with a steady drumbeat and a hint of steaming crab in the air...." Read the Entire Article.

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UN Condemns Doctrine of Discovery

Posted on January 21, 2016 by romeroinstitute

"The Doctrine of Discovery and its severe, lasting consequences for Indigenous Peoples across the world continues to spark debate at the highest levels of international diplomacy.

"The most recent development came on January 14th, when the UN Council Committee on the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) called upon the Holy See to engage in meaningful dialogue with designated representatives of Indigenous peoples to address their concerns regarding the Inter Caetara of 1493 and its related papal bulls, known collectively as the 'Doctrine of Discovery'...." Read the Entire Article.

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Native Abundance and the Wisdom of Native Food Practices

By Dan Morrison on June 19, 2013
"Food is one of the greatest gifts Mother Earth gives to us (probably a very close second behind the oxygen we need to breath). It is amazing how you can place a tiny seed in the soil and weeks to months later a plant emerges with edible fruits or vegetables. Despite what the seed and fertilizer companies tell us, all the planet needs to grow food is healthy soil, water, and sunshine. Lend some love and a helping hand, and you have a full-fledged garden or small farm.

"For millennia, indigenous people from Africa to Asia to the Americas have been working in harmony with Mother Earth to grow food. And they have freely shared their food knowledge with others. The Wampanoag taught the Pilgrims how to grow corn using the Three Sisters method...." Read the Entire Article.

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Montana tribes receives $3.1 million for housing

David Murray, dmurray@greatfallstribune.com 8:29 a.m. MST February 16, 2016

"The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Friday it has awarded $3.1 million to three Montana Indian tribes to improve reservation housing conditions for low- and moderate-income families and to stimulate community development.

"Included in the award are the Blackfeet Tribe will receive $1.1 million to rehabilitate 29 housing units scattered across the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, the Northern Cheyenne Tribe which will receive $900,000 to rehabilitate 27 substandard scattered across the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, and Confederated Salish-Kootenai Tribes which will receive $755,000 to rehabilitate 20 homes on the Flathead Indian Reservation along with $345,000 to drill a new well for the Dixon Agency and connect it to 39 home sites..." Read the Entire Article.

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Mexico indigenous people: Pope Francis asks for forgiveness

"Pope Francis has asked Mexican indigenous people in Chiapas state for forgiveness over the way they have been excluded from society.

"He made his appeal while celebrating Mass in three native languages after a new Vatican decree approved their use...." Read the Entire Article.

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