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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 063, August 2016

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Contents

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In Mesa Verde, Climate Change Reveals New Treasures, Destroys Old Ones
BY GRACE HOOD
AUG 16, 2016

Spruce Tree House at Mesa Verde National Park.

"Editor's note: This story is part of a long term reporting project from CPR News that explores how climate change is affecting Colorado, what's being done to address those changes and more.

"Think of Mesa Verde National Park and you probably imagine iconic cliff dwellings sketched in sandstone. Those homes were built by the Ancestral Pueblo before they left the area in the late 13th Century.

"Climate change may be putting some of those dwellings in jeopardy. The structural integrity of Spruce Tree House, one of the Southwest's most popular archeological attractions, is a particular worry...." Read the Entire Article.

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8 Native Olympic Athletes You Should Know About

Alex Jacobs | 8/11/16

"Natives have always enjoyed games and sports, playing for cultural and spiritual reasons. One hundred years ago, when the modern Olympic era began, the United States population was one third of what it is now and most athletes were chosen from elite eastern schools. But athletes from the working classes found ways to compete, including young Native men who were sent to the Carlisle Industrial School. Natives sent to such schools to 'Kill the Indian to Save the Man' were encouraged to Americanize, but in sports they could put aside the demoralizing aspects of 'civilizing' and compete on the field...." Read the Entire Article.

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12,300-year-old fire pit found at Hill Air Force Base
The Associated Press
First Published Aug 06 2016 03:48PM • Last Updated Aug 07 2016 09:06 pm

(Al Hartmann | The Salt Lake Tribune) Warning sign upon entering the Utah Test and Training Range in western Utah.

"Hill Air Force Base - An ancient tribal fire pit with tools, a spear tip and tobacco seeds that archaeologists say dates back 12,300 years was recently discovered on a military testing range at Hill Air Force Base...." Read the Entire Article.

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After Disenrollment Conflict, Nooksack 306 Heal With Paddle to Nisqually
Frank Hopper | 8/11/16

"I was late arriving for the canoe landings. I got stuck in traffic twice driving from Seattle to the Port of Olympia near the mouth of the Nisqually River, the destination of this year's multi-tribal canoe journey, the Paddle to Nisqually. Tribes from all over the Northwest had sent canoe families on journeys of many days, ultimately arriving at the land of the Nisqually...." Read the Entire Article.

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FIRST NATIONS FILM & VIDEO FESTIVAL CALLS FOR FILM FOR FALL FESTIVAL

Published August 16, 2016

"CHICAGO - The Call for Entries is now open for First Nations Film and Video Festival Inc's fall festival set to take place November 1 - 10, 2016, at venues across the Chicagoland area. The deadline for entries is September 15, 2016.

"'We have seen a great number of entries in the past two festivals thanks to moving to an online platform,' says Ernest M Whiteman III, Director of FNFVF Inc. 'The quality and variety of films seems to have increased as well and we are proud to showcase the little seen films right here in Chicago.'..." Read the Entire Article.

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Martha Redbone Tribute to Kay WalkingStick - Watch NMAI Livestream Archive

Vincent Schilling | 8/6/16

"In celebration of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in Washington D.C.'s exhibition Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist, Cherokee neo-soul singer Martha Redbone performed this Saturday to a full audience at 2 p.m. in the Potomac Atrium...." Read the Entire Article.

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US tribes work with scientists against climate change
Combining science and indigenous knowledge, this US research group seeks new ways to adapt to climate change.

'Climate change brings uncertainty, so we try to adapt to that uncertainty,' says Tye Baker, director of Water Resources for the Choctaw Tribe of Oklahoma [Nicholas Linn/Al Jazeera]

by Emily Crane Linn

"Oklahoma, United States - The last five years have been tough on Tye Baker, the director of Water Resources for the Choctaw Tribe of Oklahoma.

"First, there was the drought: frighteningly little precipitation from the end of 2010 until the spring of 2015. Then there was heat: 35 straight days of temperatures above 37 degrees Celcius in 2011. Then came the flooding: torrents of rain, 30cm at a time, during the summer of 2015...." Read the Entire Article.

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Native American Council Offers Amnesty to 240 Million Undocumented Whites

The Native American National Council will offer amnesty to the estimated 240 million illegal white immigrants living in the United States.

"At a meeting on Friday in Taos, New Mexico, Native American leaders weighed a handful of proposals about the future of the United State's large, illegal European population. After a long debate, NANC decided to extend a road to citizenship for those without criminal records or contagious diseases.

"'We will give Europeans the option to apply for Native Citizenship,' explained Chief Sauti of the Nez Perce tribe. 'To obtain legal status, each applicant must write a heartfelt apology for their ancestors' crimes, pay an application fee of $5,000, and, if currently on any ancestral Native land, they must relinquish that land to NANC or pay the market price, which we decide...." Read the Entire Article.

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With fewer than 400 speakers, can the Gwich'in language survive?
Gwich'in radio show host says it's a daily struggle to find guests that speak the language
CBC News Posted: Aug 08, 2016 6:00 AM CT Last Updated: Aug 08, 2016 9:27 AM CT

"I want to hear more people speaking in the language and not just only myself on the show," says Karen Mitchell, host of Nantaii. (Katherine Barton/CBC)

"With fewer than 400 Gwich'in speakers in the country, some northerners are questioning whether the language can survive - though at least one Gwich'in language advocate is optimistic that the situation is improving.

"'When I was young there was a lot of shame around speaking [it],' says William Firth, the Gwich'in language manager for the Gwich'in Social and Cultural Institute in the N.W.T..." Read the Entire Article.

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SOUTH DAKOTA HARNEY PEAK TO BE RENAMED BLACK ELK PEAK: POLITICIANS UPSET

BY LEVI RICKERT / CURRENTS / 12 AUG 2016

Harney Peak - to be Renamed Black Elk Peak - is South Dakota's tallest peak at 7,244 feet.

Peak named for Army General William Harney who murdered Native women and children.

Published August 12, 2016

"WASHINGTON- On Thursday, August 11, 2016, the U.S. Board on Geographic Names decided by a 12 - 0, with one abstention vote, to rename Harney Peak in South Dakota to Black Elk Peak...." Read the Entire Article.

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Tribes, state and OKC reach 'historic' water-rights agreement, ending 5-year battle

HEIDE BRANDES | AUGUST 11, 2016

"OKLAHOMA CITY -- After five years of debate, mediation and discussion, the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations, the State of Oklahoma and the City of Oklahoma City announced Thursday that a water rights settlement has been reached over Sardis Lake and other issues in south-central and southeastern Oklahoma.

"Called an 'historic' settlement, the water rights agreement will be presented to the U.S. Congress for approval, but all parties involved said that the long-standing battle over water rights ownership and regulatory authority of waters in the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations have been resolved...." Read the Entire Article.

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