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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 064, September 2016

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Contents

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Army Corps of Engineers Confirms Native Protesters Are Right
August 29, 2016 1:52 pm by Jeremiah Jones

"In the wake of hundreds of people protesting a couple weeks ago, Energy transfer Partners, the company attempting to construct the Dakota Access Pipeline, voluntarily stopped work at the building site just North of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation.

"The number of protesters is now over 4000 as many tribes have united to protect the land and water from contamination...." Read the Entire Article.


To support the Standing Rock Tribe during the protector movement click here.

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Debra Magpie Earling honored as new head of UM creative writing

KEILA SZPALLER keila.szpaller@missoulian.com

TOM BAUER/Missoulian
Debra Magpie Earling, right, and Arleen Adams laugh during an honoring ceremony for Earling at the Payne Family Native American Center at the University of Montana on Wednesday. Earling, a Bitteroot Salish tribal member, was recently named director of UM's creative writing program.

"At a ceremony to honor Debra Magpie Earling, the first Native American director of the University of Montana's creative writing program honored others.

"Earling, a Bitterroot Salish tribal member, offered colorful blankets and other treasures to a line of people who had supported her and UM's writing students, and she most of all praised students for showing people the way to write the stories of their lives...." Read the Entire Article.

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Smithsonian
A clay facial reconstruction of the Ancient One shows what he may have looked like.

The Ancient One Takes Another Step Toward Home

Richard Walker | 9/21/16

"The return of the Ancient One to his home is nearer.

"Federal legislation first introduced in 2015 ordering the repatriation of the Ancient One, or Kennewick Man, was approved on September 15 by the U.S. Senate as part of another bill...." Read the Entire Article.

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Over 1200 Archeologists & Museum Directors just sent a letter to President Obama demanding a halt to Dakota Access Pipeline destruction of cultural sites!
Posted on Sep 21, 2016

"In an amazing act of solidarity, over 1200 archaeologists, anthropologists, historians and museum directors sent a letter to President Obama, urging the White House administration to halt construction on the Dakota Access pipeline to prevent the destruction of cultural resources.

"It is unusual for museums to engage in this type of advocacy, but speaks to the critical natural of this issue. The significance of the cultural artifacts along the proposed route is simply too great to sacrifice for a crude oil pipeline...." Read the Entire Article.

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Another Mayan Codex Survived: Recent Analysis Proves 'Grolier Codex' Is Real

Steve Russell | 9/22/16

"A new study claims to have validated a fourth Mayan codex that escaped the Spanish efforts to destroy all evidence of written language in the Americas. The purposeful destruction of the evidence happened very early in the colonization process, so within a few generations Indian writing was commonly thought not to exist because the colonists all 'knew' that the primitive inhabitants of the Americas could not possibly have used written language...." Read the Entire Article.

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First Nations across North America sign treaty alliance against the oilsands
By Elizabeth McSheffrey in News, Energy | September 22nd 2016

"The thunderous pounding of Indigenous drums echoed in the air on Thursday as more than 50 Indigenous nations across North America rallied together to sign a historic, pan-continental treaty alliance against oilsands expansion in their traditional territory...." Read the Entire Article.

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MOOSE CREE IN CONTEXT
FIRST NATION OVERCOMES FUNDING CHALLENGES,
RETHINKS LANGUAGE REVITALIZATION
by Lauren Wildgoose
September 16, 2016

Moose Factory Island, on the Moose River in northern Ontario, Canada, is home to the Moose Cree First Nation. Photo by Lauren Wildgoose.

"The Moose Cree First Nation, located on Moose Factory Island at the southern end of James Bay, is engaged in a series of community-based language preservation initiatives in support of its unique dialect of Cree. The First Nation's Language and Culture department published the first Moose Cree dictionary in 2014 and a second edition in 2015, which will be followed by third, English-to-Cree edition next year. Geraldine Govender, Director of Language and Cultural Programs for the First Nation, coordinated the dictionary with Cree linguist Kevin Brousseau and a group of elders from the community. She is also currently working on a Moose Cree grammar project with linguist Jimena Terraza and the elders, as well as an online 'talking dictionary'. With just 150 estimated fluent speakers in Moose Factory and a registered First Nation population of 3899, Moose Cree is in urgent need of preservation. Moose Factory's remote location in the northern reaches of Ontario, accessible only by rail and water taxi for much of the year, is one of the factors endangering the language...." Read the Entire Article.

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Mining leaves a Wisconsin tribe's hallowed sites at risk

Modern boundaries complicate - and stymie - the Menominee Tribe's effort to protect burial grounds.
A "Sacred Water" story.
September 19, 2016
By Brian Bienkowski

Editor's Note: This story is part of "Sacred Water," EHN's ongoing investigation into Native American struggles-and successes-to protect culturally significant water sources on and off the reservation
Part 1 of 2

"MENOMINEE RESERVATION, Wisc.-Guy Reiter was an archaeologist before he was an activist. But the two merged after a dream six years ago.

"'I was in a van and when we drove by the White Rapids I looked over and saw an elder sitting on a dam, in full Indian regalia,' Reiter says. 'He flagged me down, I climbed the dam, and he started talking to me in Menominee.'..." Read the Entire Article.

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A Special Invitation
Ways of Peace in Algonquin and Haudenosaunee traditions

Dear Friends,

Ever since the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign in 2013, Brooklyn Friends School, a Quaker school in Downtown Brooklyn, NY has sponsored an Indigenous Peoples Program, with a theme selected and presented by our Indigenous neighbors. This year we will again sponsor a program on Tuesday, October 25. The evening program is free and the public is invited. The evening event is jointly sponsored by the Brooklyn Quaker Meeting.

The theme this year for our Indigenous Peoples program is Ways of Peace in Algonquin and Haudenosaunee traditions. The Ways of Peace have much broader scope than simply averting or ending war. They encompass every aspect of all societies and ways of life which are in harmony not just internally and with other human societies but with all of Nature of which humans are part, present and future. They include respect for Mother Earth, in accordance with the Original Instructions given them by the Creator. Our Indigenous brothers and sisters bring this message in words in Wampum, in music and dance.

The program includes refreshments, an Opening Address, discussion of the theme, and Haudenosaunee social dancing for all to participate in. Tom Porter (Mohawk), Freida Jacques (Onondaga) and Evan Pritchard (Mi'kmaq) will be among the presenters.

Location:            Friends Meetinghouse, 110 Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201. Online
                         directions at http://brooklynmeeting.org/
Date and Time:   October 25, 2016 (Tuesday) beginning 6:30 PM ending 9:00 PM
RSVP:                The event is FREE, but we do ask that you RSVP to events@tnrmediate.com and
                          let us know how many will be coming, so that we may have an approximate count.
                          This is important so that we do not run out of refreshments.

Questions? Contact Tom Rothschild tomr@tnrmediate.com

Peace, Tom Rothschild
Indian Affairs Committee
New York Yearly Meeting (Quakers)
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Brooklyn Friends School
Quaker Witness and Outreach

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Physical health tied to native language use

Second of a three-part series about Miami University's ongoing partnership with the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma

By Claire Wagner, university news and communications

"An academic review of research suggests a link between an indigenous community's language vitality and its members' health.

"For more than two centuries, U.S. government programs such as mandatory boarding schools forced Native Americans to learn European culture and language and forego their own. The outcome of these concerted efforts was a cumulative decline in the use of native languages during the last decade and a growing sense of

cultural shame among those who directly experienced these oppressive forces, said Daryl Baldwin, director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University. Baldwin is co-author of an article summarizing an emerging field of research regarding indigenous people's health in relation to language and cultural maintenance...." Read the Entire Article.

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