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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 065, October 2016

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Contents

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Resisting Piplines From Standing Rock to Bagua
by Manuela Picq
October 3, 2016

"Resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) at Standing Rock has gained unprecedented coverage. At the center of the story is a thousand-plus miles long pipeline that would transport some 500,000 barrels of oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois. The pipeline is backed by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. And It faces a huge line of Indigenous nations who've come together to say "No".

"The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe opposes the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, because it crosses sacred grounds within the boundaries of the reservation and threatens water sources in the larger region of the Missouri River...." Read the Entire Article.

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Ancient Voices, Today's Struggles:
Learning from Indigenous Resistance
A recent gathering of Indigenous activists shared powerful wisdom on protecting everyone's food, water, and lands.

By Eric Weltman
10.26.16
"The fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline has brought new attention to the long history of exploitation and ongoing threats that Indigenous peoples and their lands face from many quarters, including dirty energy corporations. But this historic effort also shows the power of solidarity in fighting corporate giants - a lesson that can help us all.

"For years, Indigenous communities have been crucial partners for Food & Water Watch as we fight together against corporate control and abuse of our vital resources. The Onondaga Nation was on the front lines in winning New York's 2014 fracking ban. Right now in Oregon, we're working with the Columbia River fishing tribes to stop Nestlé from bottling and commodifying our water. An Indigenous contingent, including members of the Ramapough Lenape tribe, helped lead the March for a Clean Energy Revolution in Philadelphia this July...." Read the Entire Article.

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Hipi Raincatchers Final 10

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DNA reveals the Higgs bison, a hybrid Ice Age species depicted in ancient cave art
Unexpected crossbreed believed to be ancestor of the European bison

A Higgs bison appears to be depicted in this painting from the Marsoulas cave in Haute-Garonne, France, drawn during the Magdalenian period. (Carole Fritz/University of Adelaide)

"Using DNA analysis, researchers have discovered that an unexpected hybrid of cattle and bison once roamed the Earth.

"The 120,000-year-old species was a cross-breed of the aurochs, the ancestor of modern cattle, and the Ice Age steppe bison, ancestors of the modern American bison or buffalo...." Read the Entire Article.

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A New Path to Prosperity in Indian Country: Exploring Opportunities for Clean Energy Development on Tribal Lands
By Karen Petersen, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

"The new energy economy is young and thriving, with plenty of room for expansion-and with the sky as the limit, it's making inroads in some unexpected places.

"From the redwood forests of northern California to the green lowlands of upstate New York, from the high desert of southern Nevada to the frozen tundra of northern Alaska, visionary Native American leaders are forging a new path to economic vitality and community resiliency. It's a new path that honors traditional ways, while addressing longstanding challenges and barriers.

"There's no denying the persistent gaps between American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations and the rest of the country in areas such as housing, healthcare, education, and employment. For generations, tribal leaders have worked to close those gaps and provide for their communities, and for some, gaming has provided one avenue for doing so. But forward-looking tribal governments are continually seeking new and innovative approaches to economic development. And increasingly, they are focusing on energy...." Read the Entire Article.

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Bella Bella, B.C.: The town that solved suicide

How remote Bella Bella emerged from its 'dark time' by reconnecting troubled youth with the land
Nancy Macdonald
September 22, 2016

Bella Bella Community School principal Jan Gladish. (Photograph by Jimmy Jeong)

"The airport in Bella Bella is a one-room shack with plastic chairs and a resident tabby cat. Last Friday, as gale force winds lashed the windows, she padded across the laps of a dozen foreign tourists outfitted in thousands of dollars in dark Gore-Tex gear before dozing off on one of their backpacks...." Read the Entire Article.

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NATIVE AMERICANS RESPOND TO #YESDAPL
BY LEVI RICKERT / CURRENTS / 24 OCT 2016

Andrea N. Garcia - Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara

Published October 24, 2016

"STANDING ROCK - Fed up with the gross misinformation being distributed by North Dakota law enforcement and the local media in North Dakota, eight American Indians respond with strong voices in a YouTube video...." Read the Entire Article.

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Nevada tribe is apparent winner in dispute over Spirit Cave Man's remains

Nicole Thompson, left, and Vivian Olds are seen inside the opening of Spirit Cave on April 19,2006, where the
body of Spirit Cave Man was found near Fallon, Nev. (AP Photo/Reno Gazette-Journal, Marilyn Newton)

By SEAN WHALEY
LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL

"CARSON CITY - The ancient remains of Spirit Cave Man may finally be going home.

"Spirit Cave Man and other human remains were discovered in 1940 at Spirit Cave, an area near the Grimes Point petroglyph area 70 miles east of the capital and just east of Fallon. The area is near the Stillwater Wildlife Refuge, a wetland and remnant of ancient Lake Lahontan that once covered much of the area...." Read the Entire Article.

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Young girl takes the stage to urge Native values of taking care of land, each other

Joan Inga Barnowsky, 11, delivers the youth keynote address during the first day of the Elders and Youth Conference at the Carlson Center in Fairbanks on Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Barnowsky is a sixth-grader from Old Harbor. (Loren Holmes / Alaska Dispatch News)

"FAIRBANKS - In a soft, clear voice, an 11-year-old girl from a small village on Kodiak Island described a vision Monday for living Alaska Native values, for embracing environmental causes, for connecting with other people in this electronic age.

"Joan Inga Barnowsky, a home-schooled sixth-grader from Old Harbor, said later she was nervous so took to a chair to calm herself as she gave the opening keynote speech for the First Alaskans Institute Elders and Youth Conference. Even though she is young and small and was sitting down, she was a big presence, a child talking about navigating old and new worlds...." Read the Entire Article.

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On a trip to Tosawihi, Joseph Holley, of the Battle Mountain Band, shows his grandson an old mining-related structure.

Culture Held Captive - Tribal Members Want Patrimony Returned
Stephanie Woodard | 10/24/16

"'How dare they keep those materials?' asked elder Kathleen Holley. 'They belong to us, and they should not be kept in a building.' A member of the Battle Mountain Band of the Te-Moak Western Shoshone, Holley had just seen a photograph of cartons at the Nevada State Museum, in Carson City.

"The photo, snapped in the museum's Indian Hill Curatorial Center during an unrelated meeting, shows shelves of boxes labeled 'Tosawihi' to indicate the sacred site in northern Nevada from which the contents were taken. The photographer is Ted Howard, cultural resources director of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribe in northern Nevada/southern Idaho, who received permission to take the photo. He called Tosawihi the spiritual heart of the Western Shoshone homeland, providing white flint, also called chert, used in healing and ceremonies...." Read the Entire Article.

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The United States Has Still Not Acknowledged It Committed Genocide Against Indigenous Peoples

Sunday, 23 October 2016 00:00

By Mark Karlin, Truthout | Interview

Indigenous Americans protest the Columbus Day celebration in Denver, Colorado, on October 9, 2007. (Photo: AJ Schroetlin)

"What myths have most of us been taught about Native Americans? In a new book, 'All the Real Indians Died Off' And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker show how generations of people in the United States have been misinformed about Indigenous Americans as part of a colonial agenda of erasure. Click here to order this important book from Truthout...." Read the Entire Article.

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