Having trouble seeing this newsletter, click here for a browser version.

Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 070, March 2017

----------

Contents

Click Here
To Help Support
the Important Work
of the
American Indian Institute


  

Fighting For, Not Fighting Against: Media Coverage and the Dakota Access Pipeline


  "Stand With Standing Rock Nov 11-15 2016" by Flickr user Leslie Peterson. Photo taken in November 2016
  (CC-BY-NC-2.0).
 

A Media Cloud & Global Voices NewsFrames Collaboration

Written by Natalie Gyenes, Connie Moon Sehat, Sands Fish, Anushka Shah, Jonas Kaiser, Paola Villarreal, Simin Kargar, Cindy Bishop, Rahul Bhargava, Rob Faris & Ethan Zuckerman

As part of our collaboration with MediaCloud.org, this article can also be found on the MediaCloud website.

"The deadline for Standing Rock campsite residents to depart their campsites along the Missouri River occurred last Wednesday. The evacuation deadline passed at 2pm local time, coincidently marking a two-year effort to prevent the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), a conduit spanning 1,172 miles with the purpose of transporting crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois. Representatives from approximately 300 of the 566 recognized Native American tribes in the United States actively participated in the effort at the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota since April of 2016...." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------
  

Historical ban on potlatch ceremony has lingering effects for Indigenous women, author says

The 1885 to 1951 ban has led to a patriarchal culture where women are excluded from leadership: Sylvia McAdam
By Lenard Monkman, CBC News Posted: Mar 25, 2017 6:00 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 25, 2017 6:00 AM ET

A photo taken in 1914 by Edward Curtis of a Kwakwaka'wakw potlatch ceremony. The potlatch was outlawed in Canada for decades, and some Indigenous leaders and activists say the ban's effects are still felt today. (Edward Curtis/Historica Canada)

"The effects of a decades-long ban that dates back to the 19th century on a traditional First Nations ceremony are still being felt today, particularly by women, say some Indigenous leaders and activists.

"The ban on the potlatch was legislated under an 1884 amendment to the 1876 Indian Act by the Canadian government, which came into effect in 1885, according to the Canadian Encyclopedia. ..." Read the Entire Article

Top

----------
  

Millionaire returning $4M piece of Manhattan to Indian tribe

By Christy Smith-Sloman                                             December 18, 2016 | 5:43am


Anthony Van Dunk (left), who is a chief of the 5,000-member Ramapough Indians, with Jean Louis Bourgeois Goldwater.

"An eccentric millionaire is giving Manhattan back to the American Indians - at least his small part of it.

"Jean-Louis Goldwater Bourgeois, 76, an architectural historian and activist for Native American causes, is in the process of transferring the deed of his $4 million, landmarked West Village house to a nonprofit controlled by the Lenape tribe, the original Manhattanites...." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------   

Native Girls Rise

How A New Generation of Native
Women Are Standing Up & FightingBack


By Colleen Curry

"'Life in a Native American reservation is among the most hopeless I have ever witnessed as a reporter. The lack of basic facilities, the joblessness, sex trafficking, absence of culture, fetal alcohol syndrome, drunk violence, joblessness and mere desperation are daunting. This is what Cheyenne and Hope from the new Native American movement are standing against, and at stake is the very survival of their people, no less. They understand and explain to us what those cycles of poverty and violence feed on and bring solutions. It is vital that these young women, who are bravely breaking the silence that is killing them, be heard by all of us. By pausing to consider the magnitude of their task, by hearing their stories as they fight every item on the by-products of poverty list, we can help them redeem the dignity they so crave for their people.' - Mariane Pearl, Journalist & Author, Managing Editor, CHIME FOR CHANGE..." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------
  

URANIUM MINE NEAR GRAND
CANYON FILLING WITH
CONTAMINATED WATER
MINE OPERATOR ENERGY FUELS VIOLATES PLAN OF OPERATIONS TO CLEAR OUT EXCESS WATER; DRILLING CONTINUES DESPITE EXPIRED ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITS

by Haul No!
March 22, 2017

A truck arrives at Canyon Mine to pick up radioactively contaminated water to haul to the White Mesa uranium mill in Blanding, UT. The placard is labelled for petroleum products. Ryan Beam photo.

"TUSAYAN, Ariz. - The controversial Canyon Mine, located just six miles from Grand Canyon's South Rim, is filling with surplus water after a wet winter. In an effort to dispose of the water from the bottom of the mine shaft, mine owner Energy Fuels Resources (USA) Inc. is trucking the contaminated water to the White Mesa Mill uranium processing facility near Blanding, Utah and spraying it, into the air and on the adjacent Kaibab National Forest, in an attempt to evaporate it. The Plan of Operations requires that all excess water be retained in holding ponds and be treated on-site.

"Simultaneously, Energy Fuels has allowed state environmental permits intended to help protect groundwater to expire..." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------
  

THE ROLE OF THE MATRIARCH IN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

BY SHERRI MITCHELL / CURRENTS, OPINION / 26 MAR 2017

GUEST ESSAY - WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

Published March 26, 2017

Editor's Note: This guest essay was originally delivered on March 16, 2017 as the Women's History Month keynote speech at the University of Maine by Sherri Mitchell.


"Kwey, Aquanu. Hello and Welcome. N'daliwisi, Wena Hamu Kwasset, nejayu Penawahpskek, N'dilnabamuk Awesus nil Peanwahpskek, naka Kahkakus, nil Sipiyak. My name is Sherri Mitchell, I'm from the Penobscot Nation. My family is Bear Clan from the Penobscot Nation and Crow Clan from the Passamaquoddy Tribe at Sipiyak. N'leeda huzeu, n'dyin. I'm happy to be here with you...." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------
  

PEOPLE

This poster from the era of the Dawes Rolls advertised land for Native Americans prompting opportunistic white
men to pay to be Indian.

Paying to Play Indian: The Dawes Rolls and the Legacy of $5 Indians

Dawes rolls rife with 'opportunistic white men' and early appropriation

Alysa Landry - March 21, 2017

"It may be fashionable to play Indian now, but it was also trendy 125 years ago when people paid $5 apiece for falsified documents declaring them Native on the Dawes Rolls.

"These so-called five-dollar Indians paid government agents under the table in order to reap the benefits that came with having Indian blood. Mainly white men with an appetite for land, five-dollar Indians paid to register on the Dawes Rolls, earning fraudulent enrollment in tribes along with benefits inherited by generations to come...." Read the Entire Article.

Top

----------

Suggestion Box

Have any comments/suggestions for Ancient Voices e-news? Send them to galen@twocircles.org. All ideas welcome.


Top

----------

You received this e-news because of your connection with the American Indian Institute or Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts Forums. If you do not wish to receive information from the Ancient Voices community, please Click here to unsubscribe
© 2017 American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana