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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 072, May 2017


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Indigenous health group strikes out on its own in quest for wellness centre

'We don't want to blame people for why it's not there, we just want to put it into place now'
By Alex Brockman, CBC News Posted: Mar 01, 2017 7:00 AM CT Last Updated: Mar 01, 2017 7:00 AM CT

Be'sha Blondin, Nicole Redvers and Rassi Nashalik are part of the Arctic Indigenous Wellness Foundation, which is committing to build an Indigenous wellness centre in Yellowknife. (Alex Brockman/CBC)

"Indigenous leaders are striking out on their own to create a Northern Indigenous wellness centre in Yellowknife as plans to build one with Stanton Territorial Hospital have stalled.

Be'sha Blondin, a Dene woman, and Rassi Nashalik, an Inuk woman, are spearheading the Arctic Indigenous Wellness Foundation alongside Yellowknife naturopath Nicole Redvers...." Read the Entire Article.

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BRISTOL BAY OUTRAGED AS TRUMP EPA SCORES BACKROOM DEAL WITH PEBBLE MINE
BRISTOL BAY LEADERSHIP VOWS TO DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO STOP PEBBLE MINE AND PROTECT THE BRISTOL BAY FISHERY

by United Tribes of Bristol Bay
May 15, 2017

Bristol Bay Leadership at a press conference in Dillingham, AK on Pebble & EPA settlement.

"DILLINGHAM, AK -Bristol Bay leaders are outraged by the Pebble Limited Partnership and Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) settlement concerning the proposed Clean Water Act protections for the Bristol Bay watershed..

"In 2010, Bristol Bay's tribes, joined by Native corporations, commercial fishermen, the sports and recreation industry, and other supporters petitioned the EPA to protect Bristol Bay from the risks posed by the Pebble mine-risks to our salmon, waters, people, and economy. EPA responded by undertaking a multi-year, peer-reviewed scientific study that was subject to extensive public participation. As a result, EPA proposed common sense protections for the Bristol Bay watershed supported by millions of Americans. Sadly, with today's announcement, these protections, have fallen victim to the petty, partisan politics of our day..." Read the Entire Article

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The western idea of private property is
flawed. Indigenous peoples have it right
Julian Brave NoiseCat

Indigenous people are on the frontlines of movements fighting for a just relationship between humanity and the land.' Photograph: Helen H Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

"We live in a world dominated by the principle of private property. Once indigenous people were dispossessed of their lands, the land was surveyed, subdivided and sold to the highest bidder. From high above, continents now appear as an endless property patchwork of green and yellow farms, beige suburban homes and metallic gray city blocks stretching from sea to shining sea.

"The central logic of this regime is productivity, and indeed it has been monstrously productive. In tandem with the industrial revolution, the fruits of billions of acres of dispossessed and parceled indigenous land across the Americas, Africa, Asia, Ireland and Australia enabled two English-speaking empires - first the British and then the American - to rise to global dominance. The latter remains the most productive economy in the world...." Read the Entire Article.

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"The Yurok people live in a stark land of salmon runs and steep, misty mountains, where giant salamanders hide under rotting logs and Bigfoot is said to prey after dusk.

"Deep in California's coastal woods near the Oregon border, the reservation straddles the mighty Klamath River, the tribe's lifeblood for centuries..." Read the Entire Article.

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Iroquois Nationals Lacrosse Documentary Premieres: Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation

Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation shows World Indoor Lacrosse Championships at Onondaga Nation

Amy Morris - May 26, 2017
"The documentary Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation showcases the sport of lacrosse and the Native American Iroquois Nationals team as they advanced to the 2015 World Indoor Lacrosse Championship (WILC) games held in the Onondaga Nation.

"The historic 2015 games were the first time the WILC games were hosted by a Native American nation. The Iroquois Nationals competed against 12 teams leading up to a fierce final last-round match against rival Team Canada...." Read the Entire Article.

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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks with Willie Grayeyes, board chairman of Utah Diné Bikéyah, an organization that created the first Bears Ears monument proposal.

Bears Ears in Crosshairs as Zinke Tours

Bears Ears National Monument under review as Zinke meets with tribes, environmentalists

Kim Baca - May 12, 2017
"As the entourage of Utah lawmakers and U.S. Department of Interior officials drove out of Butler Wash in the Bears Ears National Monument, area resident Leonard Lee, a former Navajo Nation delegate and chapter house president, shook his head slightly...." Read the Entire Article.

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Courtesy Photo

Wichita dwellings had a distinctive shape and were constructed from straw and wood.

Lost City of Etzanoa Found

Wichita Indian urban center dubbed Etzanoa by Spanish, home to some 20,000

Steve Russell - May 25, 2017
"Another of the 'lost cities' of North America may have been found, according to Dr. Donald Blakeslee, an archaeologist at Wichita State University. The Wichita Indians who discovered Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1541 and Juan de Oñate y Salazar in 1601, according to archaeological evidence, had been farming since 900 CE. The Indians who encountered the Spanish intruders lived in fairly big cities for the times. Coronado called the city he visited Quivira; Oñate found his way to an urban center he called Etzanoa...." Read the Entire Article.

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By David Ritsher and Rachel de Leon / May 17, 2017

"The standoff at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation brought national attention to the struggle over indigenous lands and resources. This video series examines the ways tribes in North America have dealt with mounting pressures from governments and corporations that take over their land for mega-projects such as dams, freeways and oil pipelines. Some tribes have fought back with lawsuits and protests; others have cut deals with energy producers. While these projects are touted as a benefit to the general population, the costs often are borne by the Native populations whose land is in the path of development...." Read the Entire Article.

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