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Ancient Voices - Contemporary Contexts

American Indian Institute, Bozeman, Montana

  

No. 077, October 2017


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CHEROKEE NATION AWARDED $800K GRANT TO BUILD HEAD START STORM SHELTERS

BY NATIVE NEWS ONLINE STAFF / CURRENTS / 10 OCT 2017

Published October 10, 2017

"TAHLEQUAH - Cherokee Nation will install storm shelters in its Head Start campuses after recently receiving an $800,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

"The above-ground storm shelters will protect nearly 300 toddlers, preschoolers and staff at seven Head Start sitesfrom severe weather and will be used as multipurpose facilities at the centers, as well. An internal notification system for staff is also being implemented during the project...." Read the Entire Article

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NAFSA TO CONGRESS: CFPB TARGETS AND ACTIVELY DISMISSES TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY

BY NATIVE NEWS ONLINE STAFF / CURRENTS / 04 OCT 2017

Senator Jon Tester (D-MT), Quannah Davis, NAFSA Executive Director Gary Davis,
and Senator Steve Daines (R-MT)

Published October 4, 2017

NAFSA's Gary Davis visits Members of Congress, staff to discuss latest CFPB actions


"WASHINGTON - The CFPB has created a dangerous precedent by ignoring tribal sovereignty, says Native American Financial Services Association (NAFSA) Executive Director Gary Davis. Davis made this case to federal lawmakers in Washington last week as he continued NAFSA's advocacy on the Hill. The most recent example of the CFPB's disregard for tribal sovereignty has surfaced due to a consent order with a non-tribal, non-NAFSA business. The order includes a provision specifically banning the consideration of tribal status/sovereignty in the application of state law.

"There are major concerns that such language will become boilerplate in CFPB consent orders, and that the CFPB is actively looking to marginalize tribal activity in the marketplace by focusing on companies in the industry that do business with tribes. You can learn more about what these actions mean for tribal lending entities (TLEs) by visiting NAFSA's website...." Read the Entire Article.

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Native veterans in South Dakota. Photo: The National Guard

Mark Charles: Moving towards truth and reconciliation of our shameful history

Posted: Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Reflections on Monday Night Football and the Shooting in Las Vegas

By Mark Charles

wirelesshogan.com

"Last night on ABC/ESPN Monday Night Football, the visiting team came out of the tunnel with a racist mascot on their jerseys and helmets, and mere minutes after the playing of the National Anthem, the host team's fans were still on their feet, mimicking the throwing of tomahawks and singing some sort of pathetic war whoop.

"Both team's owners seemed fine with it. No one in the broadcast booth said anything. President Trump declined to tweet about it. And all the sponsors and advertisers like GMC, Geico, Applebee's, several beer companies and many other mainstream corporations (both foreign and domestic) shamelessly hawked their wares throughout the entire event...." Read the Entire Article.

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Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez, right, said that tribes have to deal with layers of federal bureaucracy for most projects, adding "years … and a lot of resources" to their length and cost. Photo by Isaac Windes / Cronkite News

Cronkite News: Tribal leaders call 'empowerment' bill a step in the right direction

Carol Hopkins of the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation on the role cultural practices should play in supporting Indigenous communities

Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017

Navajo, other tribes call land-use bill a step in the right direction

By Isaac Windes
Cronkite News
cronkitenews.azpbs.org

"WASHINGTON - Tribal leaders backed a House bill Wednesday that would give tribes the ability to control more of their land, instead of having to get federal approval for virtually any use.

"The American Indian Empowerment Act would let tribes shift federally controlled trust land to "restricted fee land," a move that could save millions of dollars that tribes now spend on "burdensome regulation," while restoring a level of tribal sovereignty..." Read the Entire Article.

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DESECRATING MEDICINE, CONTAMINATING WATER, DEFILING SACRED LAND

by Garet Bleir

October 20, 2017

Red Butte. Located just 6 miles from the south rim of the Grand Canyon, this sacred site is in danger because of the Canyon uranium mine that operates adjacent. Photo Garet Bleir

"More than five million people visit the Grand Canyon each year. It's one of the world's most popular tourist destinations, yet the public knows next to nothing about the indigenous nation living on its floor.

"Geography has a lot to do with it: the territory of the Havasupai Tribe is only accessible by helicopter--or, for those more daring, through an arduous 10-mile walk to the canyon's floor. But it's also by choice: even though the Havasupai now survive on tourism, they don't make most of their knowledge and customs available to the public...." Read the Entire Article.

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James Giago Davies. Photo courtesy Native Sun News Today

James Giago Davies: Lakota culture was yanked away from its foundation long ago

Posted: Thursday, October 26, 2017

Mystical imagery is no substitute for sacred substance

By James Giago Davies
Native Sun News Today Columnist
nativesunnews.today

"At first glance this topic may seem beyond the scope of a Lakota life, but it isn't. It will probably touch upon deeply held conviction, and be uncharitably received, even by people who would otherwise like me, but my deepest held conviction is that the Lakota do not wallow in stubborn absolutes; that they have been, and will be in the future, a wise and tolerant people.

"But I could be wrong...." Read the Entire Article.

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This poster was created by the DC Native Public Relations Roundtable to raise awareness and positive visibility of Native communities during Native American Heritage Month.

5 Ways to Celebrate Native American Heritage Month

ICMN Staff - November 20, 2013
"To mark November being Native American Heritage Month, here are some suggestions for how to celebrate.

"Read a Book About American Indian History

"The American Indian College Fund suggests 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles C. Mann. The book delves into science, history and archaeology to uncover the true history of this country.

"'Contrary to what so many Americans learn in school, Columbus did not land in a sparsely settled, near-pristine wilderness,' reads the book's jacket...." Read the Entire Article.

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RANKING MEMBER GRIJALVA INTRODUCES A BILL THAT PERMANENTLY PROTECTS THE GRIZZLY BEAR & HONORS TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY AGREEMENTS

BY NATIVE NEWS ONLINE STAFF / CURRENTS / 04 OCT 2017

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone. Photo by Jake Davis.

Published October 4, 2017
"WASHINGTON - To respond to the Department of the Interior's controversial decision to remove endangered species protections for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Ranking Member Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.) introduced the Tribal Heritage and Grizzly Bear Protection Act (H.R. 3894) at a press conference today surrounded by Tribal leaders and environmentalists. This bill would ensure that grizzly bears are permanently protected for their ecological and cultural value and guarantees Tribes have a role in conserving and managing the species. Grizzly bears are considered sacred by many Tribes, but today only a small fraction of the historic grizzly populations exist in the lower 48 states...." Read the Entire Article.

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Time is ripe to reconsider historical markers and names, historians and Natives say

BRETT FRENCH french@billingsgazette.com Oct 23, 2017 Updated Oct 24, 2017

Chief Stan Grier of the Piikani Nation, center, and other tribal leaders present a petition to Yellowstone National Park deputy superintendent Pat Kenney during a protest at the Roosevelt Arch at the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in September.
SAM WILSON, Gazette Staff

"Maybe it's time to start rewriting history, or at least discuss the possibility.

"Confederate monument removals, along with requests by some tribal representatives that a mountain and valley in Yellowstone National Park named in honor of racist men be changed, have sparked discussions about how far such tactics should extend...." Read the Entire Article.

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